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Tense chart with rules and examples pdf download

Tense chart with rules and examples pdf download

Chart of tenses with rules and examples

This Free PDF Notes contains Tense chart with rules and examples pdf download for upcoming government exams. In addition, you can easily download pdf on flow chart of tenses with rules from this website. However, We made English grammar tense rules very easy to understand with the help of All tense rule chart with examples. Present, Past and future tense rules are very important to solve English grammar portion in any competitive exams like SSC, UPSC, IAS, Railway, RRB NTPC exams in India.

All Tense Rule chart and Table in English : The tense of a verb indicates the time frame in which the action or state of being expressed by the verb takes place. There are several tenses in English, and each one has its own rules and uses. Here is a chart of the tenses in English with rules and examples: Simple Present Tense, Present Perfect Continuous Tense handwritten notes pdf and Past Future Perfect Tense free pdf study material for School level and government job exams.

Today, we are sharing Tense chart with rules and examples pdf download. The present tense is a grammatical tense that describes a current event or state of being. It is used to describe things that are happening now, or to describe things that are always true. The past tense is a grammatical tense that describes a completed event or state of being in the past. It is used to describe things that have already happened. The future tense is a grammatical tense that describes an event or state of being that has not yet occurred. It is used to describe things that will happen in the future.

All Tenses Table Chart and Rule Learning in English Grammar Topics

On the other hand, This free pdf notes on Tense chart with rules and examples pdf download is important for various sarkari naukari. Firstly, The present tense is typically formed using the base form of the verb, or by adding -s or -es to the base form for third person singular subjects. The past tense is typically formed using the base form of the verb with the past tense ending -ed, or by using a past tense verb.

There are a few different ways to form the future tense in English. One common way is to use the auxiliary verb “will” followed by the base form of the main verb. Another way to form the future tense in English is to use the auxiliary verb “be” followed by the present participle of the main verb (the -ing form). This can be used to describe future events that have been planned or arranged.

  • Present Tense
    • Simple Present Tense Rule PDF
    • Present Continuous Tense
    • Present Perfect Tense
    • Present Perfect Continuous Tense
  • Past Tense
    • Simple Past Tense Rule PDF
    • Past Continuous Tense
    • Past Perfect Tense
    • Past Perfect Continuous Tense
  • Future Tense
    • Simple Future Tense Rule PDF
    • Future Continuous Tense
    • Future Perfect Tense
    • Future Perfect Continuous Tense

1. Present Tense (Tense chart with rules and examples pdf)

The present tense is a grammatical tense that describes a current event or state of being. It is used to describe things that are happening now, or to describe things that are always true. For example:

  • “I am eating breakfast.” (This describes a current event.)
  • “She speaks three languages.” (This describes a current state of being.)

The present tense is typically formed using the base form of the verb, or by adding -s or -es to the base form for third person singular subjects. For example:

  • “I eat breakfast every day.” (base form)
  • “She speaks Spanish fluently.” (base form)
  • “He walks to work.” (third person singular, -s added to base form)
  • “It snows a lot in the winter.” (third person singular, -s added to base form)

In this section we will discuss about different forms present tense, what is simple present tense ? how to use V1 + s/es ? We will explain assertive, negative and interrogative rules of present tense with examples. What is present continuous tense ? how to use is/am/are + V1+ing ?

Simple Present Tense

What is simple present tense ? how to use V1 + s/es ? We will explain assertive, negative and interrogative rules of present tense with examples.

  1. Simple Present Tense – It is used to denote scientific facts, universal truths and work done on daily basis.
    1. ASSERTIVE RULE — sub + V1 + s/es + object
      1. Example – She writes a letter.
    2. NEGATIVE RULE — sub + does not + v1 + s/es + object
      1. Example – She does not write a letter.
    3. INTERROGATIVE RULE — Does + sub + v1 + s/es + object
      1. Example – Does she write a letter?
    4. INTERROGATIVE NEGATIVE ASSERTIVE — Does + sub + not + v1 + s/es + object
      1. Example – Does she not write a letter?

Present Continuous Tense

We will explain assertive, negative and interrogative rules of present continuous tense with examples. What is present continuous Tense chart with rules and examples pdf? how to use is/am/are + V1+ing ?

  1. Present Continuous Tense – It is used to express an action taking place at the time of speaking.
    1. ASSERTIVE RULE — sub + is/am/are + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – she is writing a letter.
    2. NEGATIVE RULE — sub + is/am/are + not + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – She is not writing a letter.
    3. INTERROGATIVE RULE — is/am/are + sub + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – Is she writing a letter?
    4. INTERROGATIVE NEGATIVE RULE — is/am/are + sub + not + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – Is she not writing a letter?

Present Perfect Tense

  1. Present Perfect Tense – It is used to show an action that started in the past and has just finished.
    1. ASSERTIVE RULE — sub + has/have + v3 + object
      1. Example- She has written a letter.
    2. NEGATIVE RULE — sub + has/have + not + v3 + object
      1. Example – She has not written a letter.
    3. INTERROGATIVE RULE — has/have + sub + v3 + object
      1. Example- Has she written a letter?
    4. INTERROGATIVE NEGATIVE RULE —has/have + sub + not + v3 + object
      1. Example– Has she not written a letter?

Present Perfect Continuous Tense

  1. Present Perfect Continuous Tense – This tense shows the action which started in the past and is still continuing.
    1. ASSERTIVE RULE — sub + has/have + been + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – She has been writing a letter.
    2. NEGATIVE RULE — sub + has/have + not been + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example– She has not been writing a letter.
    3. INTERROGATIVE RULE —has/have + sub + been + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – Has she been writing a letter?
    4. INTERROGATIVE NEGATIVE RULE — has/have + she + not + been + v1 + ing + object
      1. Example – Has she not been writing a letter?

2. Past Tense (Tense chart with rules and examples pdf)

The past tense is a grammatical tense that describes a completed event or state of being in the past. It is used to describe things that have already happened. For example:

  • “I ate breakfast.” (This describes a completed event in the past.)
  • “She spoke three languages.” (This describes a completed state of being in the past.)

The past tense is typically formed using the base form of the verb with the past tense ending -ed, or by using a past tense verb. For example:

  • “I walked to the store.” (past tense ending -ed added to base form)
  • “She worked at the library.” (past tense ending -ed added to base form)
  • “He went to the park.” (past tense verb)
  • “We had a great time at the party.” (past tense verb)

Simple past tense

Past tense is know as past habits or you can say that past tense is used for past habits. Whatever action is completed in the past, this tense indicate that. Generally simple past tense is used with an adverb of time. Example – Priyansh played cricket when he was a child. But Sometimes simple past tense is used without an adverb of time. Rule for this tense is Subject + V2, Example – Priyanka wrote a poem.

  1. Assertive Sentences – Subject + V2 + Object + (.)
    1. Example – She wrote a letter.
  2. Negative Sentences – Subject + didn’t + V1 + Object + (.)
    1. Example – She didn’t write a letter.
  3. Interrogative Sentences – Did + Subject + V1 + Object + (?)
    1. Example – Did she write a letter?
  4. Interrogative Negative Sentences – Did + Subject + not + V1 + Object + (?)
    1. Example – Did she not write a letter?

Past Continuous Tense

Past continuous tense Used to denote an action or a event going on at some time in the past. How to use past continuous Tense chart with rules and examples pdf. Example – Rohit was driving a bus. Rule: was/were + ing

  1. Assertive Sentences – Subject + was/were +V1+ ing + Object + (.)
    • Example – She was writing a letter.
  2. Negative Sentences – Subject + was/were + not + ing + Object + (.)
    • Example – She was not writing a letter.
  3. Interrogative Sentences – Was/were + Subject + ing+ Object + (?)
    • Example – Was she writing a letter?
  4. Interrogative Negative Sentences – Was/were + Subject + not + ing+ Object + (?)
    • Example – Was she not writing a letter?

Past Perfect Tense

  • Used to describe an action completed before a certain moment in the past, usually a long time ago. If two actions happened in the past, past perfect is used to show the action that took place earlier.
  1. Assertive Sentences – Subject + had + V3 + Object + (.)
    • Example – She had written a letter.
  2. Negative Sentences – Subject + had + not + Object + (.)
    • Example – She had not written a letter.
  3. Interrogative Sentences – Had + Subject + V3 + Object + (?)
    • Example – Had she written a letter?
  4. Interrogative Negative Sentences – Had + Subject + not + V3 + Object + (?)
    • Example – Had she not written a letter?

Future tense (Tense chart with rules and examples pdf)

The future tense is a grammatical tense that describes an event or state of being that has not yet occurred. It is used to describe things that will happen in the future. For example:

  • “I will eat breakfast tomorrow.” (This describes a future event.)
  • “She will speak three languages fluently.” (This describes a future state of being.)

There are a few different ways to form the future tense in English. One common way is to use the auxiliary verb “will” followed by the base form of the main verb. For example:

  • “I will go to the store.”
  • “She will finish the project on time.”
  • “He will visit his grandmother next week.”
  • “We will have a party on Saturday.”

Another way to form the future tense in English is to use the auxiliary verb “be” followed by the present participle of the main verb (the -ing form). This can be used to describe future events that have been planned or arranged. For example:

  • “I am flying to Paris tomorrow.”
  • “She is presenting her research at the conference next month.”
  • “He is playing in the championship game on Sunday.”
  • “We are having a barbecue next weekend.”
  • Rules: Use the auxiliary verb “will” plus the base form of the main verb.
  • Examples: I will walk to the store. You will have a headache. It will rain tomorrow.

Future continuous and perfect tense

  1. Future continuous tense: used to describe actions that will be happening at a specific time in the future.
  • Rules: Use the auxiliary verb “will” plus the present participle (-ing form) of the main verb.
  • Examples: I will be working on my project at that time. You will be eating lunch at noon. They will be playing soccer in the park.

2. Future perfect tense: used to describe actions or states that will be completed before a specific time in the future.

  • Rules: Use the auxiliary verb “will” plus the past participle of the main verb.
  • Examples: I will have finished my homework by the time dinner starts. You will have seen that movie before you tell me about it. He will have been living here for 10 years before he moves to another city.

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